• How to Hold Yourself – Ness Lee March 1st -31st


    Dates: March 1st – 31st 2018
    Opening Reception: March 1st, 6:00-9:00pm
    Location: Project Gallery 1210 Dundas St E

    A course in time has no measurable distance, conceivable path or foreseeable structure, a mourning ensues that becomes eponymous in everything, transforming into a rumination of memories coinciding with unsettled realities.

    In a desire to lose it all, while holding on to what is left- states of mind are explored during incomprehensible stages of vulnerability. Taking form as an effort in seeking comfort, forgiveness and desire for an end of a self-perpetuated state.

    Ness Lee draws on history and personal narratives to create dreamy and surreal illustrations, paintings, sculptures, and installations. Often featuring her unique characters, Lee’s work offers a humorous and charming look at ideas of identity, culture, love, belonging, and oneness through her line work and novel use of media. Ness Lee’s work has been featured at the AGO First Thursdays, Drake Hotel, and the Tokyo Art Book Fair, as well as galleries in Boston, New York, and Toronto.

    Project Gallery is located at 1210 Dundas St E and open regularly Tues-Sat 11am-6pm or by appointment.


  • Intergenerational Trauma – Noah Brown: March 15 – April 21


    Exhibition Dates: March 15th – April 21st
    Opening Reception: March 15th 7:00pm – 9:00pm
    Location: Project Studios – 184 Munro St (rear)

    Noah Brown’s work hones in on the reality of living as a biracial androgynous male amongst the lasting trauma of slavery. His artworks stem from trauma associated to an experience where he was attacked by boys with a shared racial identity. His obsession with this traumatic incident has influenced him to dissect the social and historical significance of their behaviour, down to details of postured representation.

    Brown’s dry-felted tapestries explore the danger implied by self-expression within a heteronormative society, the shame attached to androgyny, internalized self-hatred within the black community, and a hope for the future where black youth can be emotionally-expressive.

    In response to more recent external forms of racial discrimination, he has sculpted porcelain figures of a black boy in a hoodie, cast eleven times in a plaster mould. Exploring ideas of people of colour living in accordance to societal stereotypes, thus gaining a form of comfort in following a ‘racial role’.

    “In my life, I constantly defy the stereotype of what it means to be a boy of colour. Despite the discomfort that comes with stepping outside of toxic societal expectations, I am able to express myself through different forms of visual art.” – Noah Brown

    Noah’s four years in specialized schooling as a visual arts major at Etobicoke School of the Arts have taught him ways he can gain autonomy by teaching his communities the historical significance behind our current psychological state, creating a safe and educated environment for people of colour who wish to express themselves, and to change the perception of black youth by setting an example for what minorities are capable of accomplishing. ‘Intergenerational Trauma’ is the first solo exhibition of Noah Brown’s work and will take place at Project Studios from March 15th-April 21st 2018.

    Project Studios is by appointment only. To set up an appointment please contact